All posts filed under: books on Paris

Librarie le Moniteur

One reason why Paris is a foretaste of heaven is the abundance of bookstores. These are often easy to miss if one does not make the conscious decision to take note. Of late, thanks in large part to thesis-related reading, a whole new world of bookstores with work on Paris as a city, its architecture, urban planning, public spaces and history is becoming more apparent to my hitherto blinded eyes; Among my favourite places to find such work is ‘librarie le moniteur’ at 7, place de l’Odeon’. There is quite a treasure trove of well thought out work from some of the top thinkers and writers on urban spaces, design and such. It’s a fantastic place to pick up anything from coffee table books on architecture to well written academic work on the human and economic geography of Paris and other old and new cities. They even have a great kids book section with fabulous gifts for curious little minds who might also want to pick up a word or two in French. One must …

Paris Fashion Week – Ready to Wear Fall/Winter 2011/12

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/bcvideo/1.0/iframe/embed.html?videoId=100000000682502&playerType=embedFashion week is back in the city, showcasing ready to wear collections for the Fall/Winter of 2011/12. Apart from the Galliano situation – there are several other reasons to celebrate this round of Paris Fashion week – chief among them Lady Gaga’s weird and wonderful presence! The countdown for Men’s 2011/12 fall/winter fashion collections (between the 22nd to 26th June) now begins!

"Fave" Classic books on Paris

One of the advantages of traveling is catching up on reading – and especially on subjects you love but don;t get round to do so while in the ‘rat race”. So, I took the time away to read old books on Paris and these were my favourite classic titles: Thomas Okey – The Story of Paris: insightful book set in early 20th Century Paris. Paris: with Pen and Pencil, David W Bartlett: amazing depiction of a very old (“when Louis Napoleon was president of the Republic” and when Napolen III was emperor of France), by a Londoner. Fantastic sketches of the city! The Paris Sketch book by William Makepeace Thackeray – another fantastic collection of sketches and an interesting insight into 19th Century Europe and France. Loved this! This one was not quite exactly and solely about Paris, per se but inextricably linked to the city: Matilda Betham-Edwards’ “East of Paris” And the reading list for coming weeks will include:“Paris as it was and as it is” by Francis W Blangdon“A street in PAris and …

Catching up on the Classics: Books on Paris (1)

This week my university studies have taken me far from Paris – all the way to West Africa. And while the programme is demanding and the schedule is a bit tight – we had a respectably long flight here and have honorable slots of personal time – so what better to do than (of course apart from skype-ing family) read books that I’ve always wanted to read. Of late I’ve had an itch to read ‘classic books’ – well, it’s not quite an involuntary impulse to read old books but rather than that I finally gained access to Amazon.com’s list of classic books published before 1923 that are now free of copyright and can be dowlnaded onto a kindle or ipad for free. Naturally, I went wild on amazon and downloaded every classic that I’ve always wanted to read and never quite got round to getting hold off. Among them is a stash of classics on Paris that I’ve been asolutely unable to stop reading – and a favourite thus far has been Thomas Okey’s …

Hemingway’s 1920s Paris!

Prior to coming to Paris, one of the books that I was most eager to get my hands on was Hemingway’s ” a moveable feast” – I had even thought of naming the blog ” A moveable Feast” before I was lovingly told that the reference would be difficult to understand and meaningless. Not that Anon’s Paris makes significantly more sense – but I digress. “A moveable feast’ was one of those memoirs of a young person who lived in Paris for a while, fell in love with the place – so much that it ended up making a lasting impression upon his (Hemingway’s) life. I imagined (rather presumptuously putting myself in the same league of Ernest Hemingway!) that I would definitely relate to author’s memoirs of living in this city. So, I was very pleasantly surprised to pick up a new edition of “A moveable feast’ that incorporates parts of the manuscript initially edited out, while modifying some of the remaining sections. Thus far, Hemingway’s writing and description of an old Paris are captivating …

"Metrostop Paris" by Gregor Dallas

I recently picked up an entertaining read that I knew would be interesting from line one of Chapter one which reads “The best time to visit Metrostop No. 1, Denfert-Rochereau is in the morning of Paris’s first day at work, which for most people in Paris is on a Tuesday.” Call it love at first line. This book is an engaging. light- read that takes the reader on a history tour of twelve metro stops around the city. The book strikes a great balance between offering insights of the city that are of historic value while offering entertaining anecdotes and tales of the city that this blogger is head over heels about. Greg Dallas’ “Metrostop Paris: History from the City’s Heart” is a worhtwhile read for all Paris lovers and great bed side reading, or better still a great read to take on the metro to the various stops described by Dallas. Amazon.com describes the book perfectly: “The book includes visits to Paris’s catacombs at ‘Hell’s Gate’, the literary cafés and old jazz cellars of …

"The Seven Ages of Paris"

Well, while riding in the metro and reading through Alistair Horne’s 2002 “Seven Ages of Paris”, it was difficult not to wince at his vivid use of language to describe Paris’ lively and borderline ‘barbaric’ past. Dividing Paris into seven different epochs, he paints an engaging, well researched portrait of an intriguing, history rich city which this blogger highly recommends! Well, I have actually just completed reading the first ‘age’ covering 1180 to 1314 but believe it will be fascinating going through the remainder. So far , so good – and gory. The politics, international relations and domestic politics of Paris in her ‘first age’ are portrayed in quite vivid, fast paced and striking detail – and so far, few paragraphs epitomise the author’s gory, bloody, vivid writing as his description of the fate of lovers of Phillipe ‘le bel’s amorous daughters at the turn of the fourteenth century – whose final moments included being disemboweled, skinned and decapitated in public to an excited Parisian crowd ‘screaming itself hoarse’ in heady glee at the swift, …